Climate Change is a Civil Rights Issue

Oct 20, 2022

Climate change is a real and present threat. It's one that particularly affects people of color, who are often on the front lines of its effects. That's why it's so important to understand climate change as a civil rights issue. In this blog post, we'll explore how climate change disproportionately affects people of color.

Communities of color and marginalized communities are the hardest hit during a severe weather event.

When a severe weather event happens, it's always the communities of color and marginalized communities that are hit the hardest. They're the ones who don't have access to resources, who don't have insurance, and who can't just pick up and leave when a hurricane or tornado hits. And yet, time and time again, these are the communities that are left to rebuild on their own. It's not fair, and it needs to change. If we want to build a more resilient society, we need to start by investing in the communities that are most vulnerable to severe weather events. Only then will we be able to protect everyone during a natural disaster.

 

Black Americans are 40% more likely to live in an area where extreme temperatures will result in death. Latino Americans are 43% more likely to lose work hours due to intense heat. 

Climate change is often spoken about in terms of its future effects, but it's important to remember that its impacts are already being felt by vulnerable communities across the United States. For example, black Americans are 40% more likely to live in an area where extreme temperatures will result in death, while Latino Americans are 43% more likely to lose work hours due to intense heat. This is just one example of how climate change disproportionately affects marginalized communities. For many people of color, the effects of climate change are a matter of life and death. And yet, these communities are often the least represented in the conversation about what needs to be done to address the problem. It's time for that to change. We need to listen to the voices of those who are most affected by climate change and make sure that their needs are at the forefront of our efforts to mitigate its effects.

 

People of color are more likely to be permanently displaced or homeless after a natural disaster (such as Hurricane Katrina)

Natural disasters often have a disproportionate impact on low-income communities and communities of color. This is due in part to the fact that these communities are more likely to live in vulnerable areas, such as floodplains or coastal areas. They are also less likely to have the resources to quickly rebuild after a disaster strikes. As a result, people of color are more likely to be permanently displaced or homeless after a natural disaster. This was tragically illustrated by Hurricane Katrina, which had a devastating impact on the African American community in New Orleans. In the aftermath of the storm, many people were forced to leave their homes and live in poverty-stricken conditions. Today, nearly fifteen years later, many African Americans have still not been able to recover from the hurricane. The lasting effects of Katrina illustrate the need for policies that specifically address the needs of communities of color following a natural disaster.

 

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